Chemical Element Silver

Silver, a chemical element, exists in the periodic table with the symbol “Ag” and atomic number 47. Silver is a soft white lustrous transition metal. Due to the fact that it has the highest electrical and thermal conductivity of any metal, silver is widel used throughout the world, used in used in coins, jewelry, tableware, and photography. Silver occurs in minerals and in free form. I’m sure if you looked you would have in your household several objects that are made of polished silver. For example: Silver dollars, or Silver cutlery, or photography equipment. Being just a bit harder than gold, silver is very ductile and malleable. Because of silver’s… Read More

Continue Reading

Hubble Telescope

One of the most important telescopes in the history of astronomy, the Hubble telescope has allowed observers to peer farther into space than any previous telescope. By moving outside and above the atmosphere of the earth, the Hubble telescope has been able to observe visual data much more clearly than a terrestrial telescope, and it has been able to see much farther into the ultraviolet and infrared spectrums as well, since these spectra are largely absorbed by the earth’s atmosphere. Thus, by moving the observing platform into open space, the Hubble telescope has given a much clearer view of the universe, allowing scientists to peer even deeper into space. The… Read More

Continue Reading

Special And General Principle Of Relativity

By Albert Einstein The basal principle, which was the pivot of all our previous considerations, was the special principle of relativity, i.e. the principle of the physical relativity of all uniform motion. Let as once more analyze its meaning carefully. It was at all times clear that, from the point of view of the idea it conveys to us, every motion must be considered only as a relative motion. Returning to the illustration we have frequently used of the embankment and the railway carriage, we can express the fact of the motion here taking place in the following two forms, both of which are equally justifiable : (a) The carriage… Read More

Continue Reading

Teens Need Math To Land Dream Jobs

What do doctors, lawyers and architects have in common? For one, they are among teens’ hottest career choices. They also require a significant understanding of math at work every day. Despite this, many teens are not motivated to take advanced math classes to help them prepare for success in these future careers. A telephone survey of 1,000 12- to 17-year-olds commissioned by Texas Instruments revealed that four out of five teenagers believe math is important for achieving their goals of being doctors, scientists, executives and lawyers, but only half are planning to take advanced math classes beyond their schools’ minimum requirements. The survey showed 80 percent of teens want to… Read More

Continue Reading

Smarter Ways To Teach Math

Schools across the country have found new ways to make math add up for students-and the country’s most recent “report card” is showing the results of that hard work. According to the U.S. Department of Education, a study called the Nation’s Report Card, which provides state-by-state educational data, shows across-the-board gains in mathematics. In fact, overall fourth-grade and eighth-grade math scores rose to all-time highs, according to the study. The news comes as many Americans have focussed on ways to help their children improve their math scores in an effort to help ensure that their children have more successful academic and financial futures. To help, many schools have used new… Read More

Continue Reading

The Invention Of Television

The transmission of images obsessed inventors as early as 1875 when George Carey of Boston proposed his cumbersome system. Only five years later, the principle of scanning a picture, line by line and frame by frame – still used in modern television sets – was proposed simultaneously in the USA (by W.E. Sawyer) and in France (by Maurice Leblanc). The first complete television system – using the newly discovered properties of selenium – was patented in Germany in 1884, by Paul Nipkow. Boris Rosing of Russia actually transmitted images in 1907. The idea to incorporated cathode -ray tubes was proposed in 1911 by a Scottish engineer, Campbell Swinton. Another Scot,… Read More

Continue Reading

The Aurora Lights

Lights in the sky have fascinated us for thousands of years. The lights in the far north and south of our planet are some of the more famous ones. What was in that Soup? Travel to Antarctica or the Arctic and you’ll start thinking you are having hallucinations. During the evenings, the sky will literally glow. In the Northern Hemisphere these lights are known as the aurora borealis. They are part of a larger light phenomenon known as aurora. In the Southern Hemisphere, these lights are known as the aurora australis or southern lights. In certain countries such as Russia, the northern lights are known as the white nights. Regardless… Read More

Continue Reading